Two dead in flight lesson crash near Texas airport

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Two men, a teacher and a student, died during a flight lesson near the Llano Municipal Airport, north of San Antonio. The fatal airplane accident happened when a 60-year-old instructor and his 51-year-old student were practicing "touch-and-go" maneuvers -- repeated takeoffs and short landings that do not bring the aircraft to a full stop.

Investigators have not speculated or reported on what happened to cause the Saturday afternoon plane crash. People who knew the highly-experienced Kerrville pilot and instructor said they were shocked to learn of his death.

The service manager at Kerrville Aviation noted that the 40-year flying veteran, with more than 6,500 hours of logged flight time, made safety a priority. The fatal flight lesson involved the Bertram student's plane, not the two Cessna Skyhawks at the Llano Municipal Airport owned by the instructor.

The use of student-owned planes during instruction is apparently common.

Agencies like the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will inspect the crash site and look for clues to explain the accident. Technical experts will examine the aircraft structure and engines.

Human error is the cause of many aviation accidents, although a plane or parts manufacturer can also be held liable for negligence.

The death of a loved one in a plane crash is a devastating, permanent personal loss for surviving family members. Compensation is possible to relieve a family's financial suffering through a civil action against those responsible for the tragedy.

Multiple inspection agencies are often involved in the search for answers after a fatal civil aircraft accident. Personal injury attorneys who represent victims and affected families must have the unique qualifications to navigate the complex laws that apply to the aviation industry.

Source: kxan.com, "Kerr County pilot will be missed," Ignacio Garcia, Aug. 26, 2012